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This month, PEN honors Algerian poet and novelist Tahar Djaout. In 1993, the accomplished Algerian writer was murdered by a fundamentalist group as he was leaving his home because, according to one of the attackers, Djaout “wielded a fearsome pen that could have an effect on Islamic sectors.”
(via PEN.org » Blog Archive Case Histories: Tahar Djaout - PEN.org)

This month, PEN honors Algerian poet and novelist Tahar Djaout. In 1993, the accomplished Algerian writer was murdered by a fundamentalist group as he was leaving his home because, according to one of the attackers, Djaout “wielded a fearsome pen that could have an effect on Islamic sectors.”

(via PEN.org » Blog Archive Case Histories: Tahar Djaout - PEN.org)

To speak means, above all, to assume a culture, to support the weight of a civilization.

These words were written by the French-Algerian theorist, philosopher, psychiatrist and revolutionary Frantz Fanon (1925-1961), who would be turning 87 today.

In his outstanding book Black Skin, White Masks, Fanon describes through a post-colonial lens the experiences of the black male in a state of exile or displacement. He also analyzes the complex relationship between language and identity, revealing that words are signs that express the complex underpinnings of a culture.