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What happens when you give Kindles to kids in Ghana? Results:

The New York City Department of Education issued its first guidelines for how teachers should navigate social media following a rise in the number of complaints involving school employees who inappropriately contact students through Facebook, texting and email.

Terry’s principal, Philip Weinberg, calls the guidelines common sense.

“As an old English teacher, even the language of that kind of interaction is problematic,” he says. “We know that we’re not our students’ friends as much as we love them and care about them in genuine ways. We need to establish specific boundaries about the kinds of interactions we have with young people.”

Friend Your Students? New York City Schools Say No : All Tech Considered : NPR

The school I’m going to does not have any policies on social networking and students. When I interviewed the cheerleading coach told me that she is friends with a lot of the kids on Facebook.

What are the reasons for a public school teacher to be friends with your students?

(via itssnix)

theatlantic:

Why Is General McChrystal Teaching an Off-the-Record Course at Yale?

McChrystal, who formerly led special operations forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and later became a senior American commander in Afghanistan, now teaches a class at Yale’s Grand Strategy Program, where he integrates his military experience with his studies on leadership. In the New York Times, McCyrstal is quoted as saying “the only reason I’m here to teach,” compared with “somebody who’s got a Ph.D., is because I’ve been through it.”
McChrystal must have been through something ominous because, according to Elisabeth Bumiller’s  Times article, Yale University imposes restrictions on students who sit in McChrystal’s classes, demanding that they take notes on an “off the record” basis — i.e., not for attribution.
Yale’s extraordinary act seems drastically out of place with notions of academic and intellectual freedom. At the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where I teach history, intellectual freedom is fiercely encouraged and protected. In addition, there is also accountability. No matter what I say in my history classes - either about history or my combat experience — cadets are free to tell it to the world, critique it, or reject it privately or publicly. Restrictions on cadets don’t exist even for an instructor with direct ties to the U.S. military.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Why Is General McChrystal Teaching an Off-the-Record Course at Yale?

McChrystal, who formerly led special operations forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and later became a senior American commander in Afghanistan, now teaches a class at Yale’s Grand Strategy Program, where he integrates his military experience with his studies on leadership. In the New York Times, McCyrstal is quoted as saying “the only reason I’m here to teach,” compared with “somebody who’s got a Ph.D., is because I’ve been through it.”

McChrystal must have been through something ominous because, according to Elisabeth Bumiller’s  Times article, Yale University imposes restrictions on students who sit in McChrystal’s classes, demanding that they take notes on an “off the record” basis — i.e., not for attribution.

Yale’s extraordinary act seems drastically out of place with notions of academic and intellectual freedom. At the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where I teach history, intellectual freedom is fiercely encouraged and protected. In addition, there is also accountability. No matter what I say in my history classes - either about history or my combat experience — cadets are free to tell it to the world, critique it, or reject it privately or publicly. Restrictions on cadets don’t exist even for an instructor with direct ties to the U.S. military.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]