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missfolly:

Auguste Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917)
‘The world famous 77 year old French sculptor Auguste Rodin froze to death in an unheated attic in Meudon, France. In 1923, Marcell Tirel, Rodin’s secretary, published a book alleging this and that Rodin had applied to the government for quarters as warm as those wherein his statues were stored, but the government turned him down. It is said that other officials and friends promised coal for heating but never sent it.’

missfolly:

Auguste Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917)

‘The world famous 77 year old French sculptor Auguste Rodin froze to death in an unheated attic in Meudon, France. In 1923, Marcell Tirel, Rodin’s secretary, published a book alleging this and that Rodin had applied to the government for quarters as warm as those wherein his statues were stored, but the government turned him down. It is said that other officials and friends promised coal for heating but never sent it.’

pasttensevancouver:

Jack Black in Vancouver, 1894
Jack Black came to Vancouver in 1894 after he and his Chinese cellmate busted out of a Revelstoke jail using a hacksaw. They hopped a boxcar to Vancouver, where Black rolled a drunk, smoked opium at Wing Sang, and got hog-tied in a botched robbery. He continued his perpetual crime spree throughout BC before getting pinched in Victoria, which earned him a two-year stretch at BC Penitentiary in New Westminster, where he was born. While there, the grandfather of another famous New West son, Raymond Burr, gave him the lash.
Jack Black (probably an alias) lived the life of any number of old west stock characters, including yegg, hobo, grifter, desperado, and hophead. More importantly, he eventually went straight and wrote his memoirs, You Can’t Win (1926), giving us a rare interior view of the world inhabited by the mostly anonymous underclass of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
The book was a hit and made Black somewhat of a celebrity. He had his portrait (above right) taken by well-known photographer Edward Weston, and heavily influenced the likes of William S. Burroughs, who drew from You Can’t Win to write his classic beat novel, Junkie. MGM Studios recruited Black as a salaried Hollywood writer, presumably to give its crime flicks a touch of authenticity. 
For more on Jack Black’s time in BC, check out “A Wild West Wanderer’s Adventures in BC” by John Mackie.
Source: Left: Mugshot printed in the San Francisco Call, 5 January 1912; right: portrait by Edward Weston ca. 1930, via The Chiseler

pasttensevancouver:

Jack Black in Vancouver, 1894

Jack Black came to Vancouver in 1894 after he and his Chinese cellmate busted out of a Revelstoke jail using a hacksaw. They hopped a boxcar to Vancouver, where Black rolled a drunk, smoked opium at Wing Sang, and got hog-tied in a botched robbery. He continued his perpetual crime spree throughout BC before getting pinched in Victoria, which earned him a two-year stretch at BC Penitentiary in New Westminster, where he was born. While there, the grandfather of another famous New West son, Raymond Burr, gave him the lash.

Jack Black (probably an alias) lived the life of any number of old west stock characters, including yegg, hobo, grifter, desperado, and hophead. More importantly, he eventually went straight and wrote his memoirs, You Can’t Win (1926), giving us a rare interior view of the world inhabited by the mostly anonymous underclass of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The book was a hit and made Black somewhat of a celebrity. He had his portrait (above right) taken by well-known photographer Edward Weston, and heavily influenced the likes of William S. Burroughs, who drew from You Can’t Win to write his classic beat novel, Junkie. MGM Studios recruited Black as a salaried Hollywood writer, presumably to give its crime flicks a touch of authenticity. 

For more on Jack Black’s time in BC, check out “A Wild West Wanderer’s Adventures in BC” by John Mackie.

Source: Left: Mugshot printed in the San Francisco Call, 5 January 1912; right: portrait by Edward Weston ca. 1930, via The Chiseler

Top 10 Most Misunderstood Lines in Literary History
millionsmillions:

“The year is 1962, and ad exec Martin K. Speckter has a punctuation problem.
Madison Avenue is debating the merits of a streamlined new European import called Helvetica. Roy Lichtenstein’s filling canvases with comic book characters and hand-painted typefaces. Andy Warhol’s cranking out Campbell’s soup cans in The Factory. Art is becoming commerce and commerce, art.
Meanwhile, JFK’s in office, the Vietnam War’s escalating, and The Pill’s finally received FDA approval. What’s needed is a typographically elegant way to notate surprise, disbelief, and incredulous excitement. For a single symbol to punctuate sentences like “Who’s that?!” and “What the hell?!”
Speckter’s solution? The interrobang. A stylish fusion of the question mark (that’s the “interro” part) and the exclamation point (known in old-timey typesetter’s slang as the “bang”), his unusual new creation looked like this.”
— You Call that a Punctuation Mark?! The Interrobang Celebrates its 50th Birthday by Nora Maynard

millionsmillions:

“The year is 1962, and ad exec Martin K. Speckter has a punctuation problem.

Madison Avenue is debating the merits of a streamlined new European import called Helvetica. Roy Lichtenstein’s filling canvases with comic book characters and hand-painted typefaces. Andy Warhol’s cranking out Campbell’s soup cans in The Factory. Art is becoming commerce and commerce, art.

Meanwhile, JFK’s in office, the Vietnam War’s escalating, and The Pill’s finally received FDA approval. What’s needed is a typographically elegant way to notate surprise, disbelief, and incredulous excitement. For a single symbol to punctuate sentences like “Who’s that?!” and “What the hell?!”

Speckter’s solution? The interrobang. A stylish fusion of the question mark (that’s the “interro” part) and the exclamation point (known in old-timey typesetter’s slang as the “bang”), his unusual new creation looked like this.”

You Call that a Punctuation Mark?! The Interrobang Celebrates its 50th Birthday by Nora Maynard

auntada:

Chester Himes began his writing career while serving a sentence in an Ohio prison for armed robbery, from the late 1920s to mid 1930s. He published several short stories, using his prison number as his pen name. He continued to write after his parole in 1936, working odd jobs to support himself. He eventually moved to Los Angeles, where he worked as a screenwriter and novelist. Himes later wrote about the racism he experienced in Los Angeles:

Up to the age of thirty-one I had been hurt emotionally, spiritually and physically as much as thirty-one years can bear. I had lived in the South, I had fallen down an elevator shaft, I had been kicked out of college, I had served seven and one half years in prison, I had survived the humiliating last five years of Depression in Cleveland; and still I was entire, complete, functional; my mind was sharp, my reflexes were good, and I was not bitter. But under the mental corrosion of race prejudice in Los Angeles I became bitter and saturated with hate.

In the 1950s, Himes emigrated to France, joining a number of African American writers and artists who left the United States seeking greater freedom and acceptance. He lived in France until 1969, when he moved to Moraira, Spain. He remained in Spain until his death in 1984.
Himes was an extremely prolific writer whose works encompassed many genres. His Harlem Detective series, which comprised nine novels, brought him the most success. Three movies are based on the series: Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), its sequel, Come Back, Charleston Blue (1972) and A Rage in Harlem (1991).

auntada:

Chester Himes began his writing career while serving a sentence in an Ohio prison for armed robbery, from the late 1920s to mid 1930s. He published several short stories, using his prison number as his pen name. He continued to write after his parole in 1936, working odd jobs to support himself. He eventually moved to Los Angeles, where he worked as a screenwriter and novelist. Himes later wrote about the racism he experienced in Los Angeles:

Up to the age of thirty-one I had been hurt emotionally, spiritually and physically as much as thirty-one years can bear. I had lived in the South, I had fallen down an elevator shaft, I had been kicked out of college, I had served seven and one half years in prison, I had survived the humiliating last five years of Depression in Cleveland; and still I was entire, complete, functional; my mind was sharp, my reflexes were good, and I was not bitter. But under the mental corrosion of race prejudice in Los Angeles I became bitter and saturated with hate.

In the 1950s, Himes emigrated to France, joining a number of African American writers and artists who left the United States seeking greater freedom and acceptance. He lived in France until 1969, when he moved to Moraira, Spain. He remained in Spain until his death in 1984.

Himes was an extremely prolific writer whose works encompassed many genres. His Harlem Detective series, which comprised nine novels, brought him the most success. Three movies are based on the series: Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), its sequel, Come Back, Charleston Blue (1972) and A Rage in Harlem (1991).

laphamsquarterly:

The Ransom Center on Tumblr!
ransomcenter:

Early printed book contains rare evidence of medieval spectacles 
Front parchment pastedown, now detached, with offset from the manuscript visible on the boards. Both the front and rear pastedowns came from the same medieval manuscript and are now detached from the boards. Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear flyleaf: It’s difficult to tell exactly how the spectacles left their impression, but they must have been sandwiched between the two parchment endleaves for an extended period of time. Photo by Pete Smith.
This second rear flyleaf contains the most visible trace of the spectacles.  Upon very close examination and under special lighting one can see the rivet used to join the two halves of the spectacles together at the bridge.  Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear pastedown: the impression from the spectacles shows faintly through from the other side. Photo by Pete Smith.


laphamsquarterly:

The Ransom Center on Tumblr!
ransomcenter:

Early printed book contains rare evidence of medieval spectacles 
Front parchment pastedown, now detached, with offset from the manuscript visible on the boards. Both the front and rear pastedowns came from the same medieval manuscript and are now detached from the boards. Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear flyleaf: It’s difficult to tell exactly how the spectacles left their impression, but they must have been sandwiched between the two parchment endleaves for an extended period of time. Photo by Pete Smith.
This second rear flyleaf contains the most visible trace of the spectacles.  Upon very close examination and under special lighting one can see the rivet used to join the two halves of the spectacles together at the bridge.  Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear pastedown: the impression from the spectacles shows faintly through from the other side. Photo by Pete Smith.


laphamsquarterly:

The Ransom Center on Tumblr!
ransomcenter:

Early printed book contains rare evidence of medieval spectacles 
Front parchment pastedown, now detached, with offset from the manuscript visible on the boards. Both the front and rear pastedowns came from the same medieval manuscript and are now detached from the boards. Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear flyleaf: It’s difficult to tell exactly how the spectacles left their impression, but they must have been sandwiched between the two parchment endleaves for an extended period of time. Photo by Pete Smith.
This second rear flyleaf contains the most visible trace of the spectacles.  Upon very close examination and under special lighting one can see the rivet used to join the two halves of the spectacles together at the bridge.  Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear pastedown: the impression from the spectacles shows faintly through from the other side. Photo by Pete Smith.


laphamsquarterly:

The Ransom Center on Tumblr!
ransomcenter:

Early printed book contains rare evidence of medieval spectacles 
Front parchment pastedown, now detached, with offset from the manuscript visible on the boards. Both the front and rear pastedowns came from the same medieval manuscript and are now detached from the boards. Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear flyleaf: It’s difficult to tell exactly how the spectacles left their impression, but they must have been sandwiched between the two parchment endleaves for an extended period of time. Photo by Pete Smith.
This second rear flyleaf contains the most visible trace of the spectacles.  Upon very close examination and under special lighting one can see the rivet used to join the two halves of the spectacles together at the bridge.  Photo by Pete Smith.
Rear pastedown: the impression from the spectacles shows faintly through from the other side. Photo by Pete Smith.

laphamsquarterly:

The Ransom Center on Tumblr!

ransomcenter:

Early printed book contains rare evidence of medieval spectacles 

Front parchment pastedown, now detached, with offset from the manuscript visible on the boards. Both the front and rear pastedowns came from the same medieval manuscript and are now detached from the boards. Photo by Pete Smith.

Rear flyleaf: It’s difficult to tell exactly how the spectacles left their impression, but they must have been sandwiched between the two parchment endleaves for an extended period of time. Photo by Pete Smith.

This second rear flyleaf contains the most visible trace of the spectacles.  Upon very close examination and under special lighting one can see the rivet used to join the two halves of the spectacles together at the bridge.  Photo by Pete Smith.

Rear pastedown: the impression from the spectacles shows faintly through from the other side. Photo by Pete Smith.

foreignaffairsmagazine:

The First Global Man — The Americas Before and After Columbus
A pair of books by Charles Mann describe life in the Americas before and after Columbus linked the hemispheres and kicked off the first era of globalization. It turns out that the New World was far more technologically advanced than subsequent generations have realized, with plenty to teach the Old — especially about how to simultaneously exploit and preserve key natural resources.
foreignaffairsmagazine:

The First Global Man — The Americas Before and After Columbus
A pair of books by Charles Mann describe life in the Americas before and after Columbus linked the hemispheres and kicked off the first era of globalization. It turns out that the New World was far more technologically advanced than subsequent generations have realized, with plenty to teach the Old — especially about how to simultaneously exploit and preserve key natural resources.

foreignaffairsmagazine:

The First Global Man — The Americas Before and After Columbus

A pair of books by Charles Mann describe life in the Americas before and after Columbus linked the hemispheres and kicked off the first era of globalization. It turns out that the New World was far more technologically advanced than subsequent generations have realized, with plenty to teach the Old — especially about how to simultaneously exploit and preserve key natural resources.