PEN on Twitter

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“Almost a year ago, Swedish foreign ministerCarl Bildt declared before the UN Human Rights Council that the “same rights that people have offline … must also be protected online.” This was the underlying theme of a groundbreaking May 2011 report by UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression Frank La Rue. The report, which was endorsed by 41 governments, detailed how established human rights principles apply to the internet and made recommendations for putting these principles into practice. After a year of inaction, the time has come for a concerted, collective effort by democratic countries to carry out the recommendations of the La Rue report.”
(via A ‘To Do’ List for Internet Freedom | Freedom House)

Almost a year ago, Swedish foreign ministerCarl Bildt declared before the UN Human Rights Council that the “same rights that people have offline … must also be protected online.” This was the underlying theme of a groundbreaking May 2011 report by UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression Frank La Rue. The report, which was endorsed by 41 governments, detailed how established human rights principles apply to the internet and made recommendations for putting these principles into practice. After a year of inaction, the time has come for a concerted, collective effort by democratic countries to carry out the recommendations of the La Rue report.”

(via A ‘To Do’ List for Internet Freedom | Freedom House)

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From the geektivists at Harvard, some great tools for the online change-maker:

"Below we will map out the basics of several options available to users—including proxies, VPNs, and Tor—as well as future emerging technologies like Telex. This is meant to be an introduction to the types of tools that are available, as well as an introduction to the limitations and risks of each. We have not tested all of them, so as always, do your own research before trusting a third party with your data."

(Source: blogs.law.harvard.edu)

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Go internet freedom! PEN is going to be debating its own digital freedom declaration at the PEN International Congress this fall. All PEN members are invited!

Today, we—representatives of the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Instituteand Free Press—join more than 85 organizations, ranging from Amnesty International and the Electronic Frontier Foundation to Mozilla and Cheezburger Inc., in announcing aDeclaration of Internet Freedom. Centered on core principles of free expression, access, openness, innovation, and privacy, our goal is to spark a global discussion among Internet users and communities about the Internet and our role in it.

(via Declaration of Internet Freedom calls for digital rights.)

Go internet freedom! PEN is going to be debating its own digital freedom declaration at the PEN International Congress this fall. All PEN members are invited!

Today, we—representatives of the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Instituteand Free Press—join more than 85 organizations, ranging from Amnesty International and the Electronic Frontier Foundation to Mozilla and Cheezburger Inc., in announcing aDeclaration of Internet Freedom. Centered on core principles of free expression, access, openness, innovation, and privacy, our goal is to spark a global discussion among Internet users and communities about the Internet and our role in it.

(via Declaration of Internet Freedom calls for digital rights.)

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humanrightswatch:

A new draft law on information technology crimes would restrict free speech in violation of international law and poses a severe threat to journalists, whistleblowers, and peaceful activists. The pending law includes vague provisions that would allow Iraqi authorities to harshly punish expression they decide constitutes a threat to governmental, social, or religious interests. The Council of Representatives, the parliament, should not approve the law without revising it to remove the rights restrictions.

humanrightswatch:

A new draft law on information technology crimes would restrict free speech in violation of international law and poses a severe threat to journalists, whistleblowers, and peaceful activists. The pending law includes vague provisions that would allow Iraqi authorities to harshly punish expression they decide constitutes a threat to governmental, social, or religious interests. The Council of Representatives, the parliament, should not approve the law without revising it to remove the rights restrictions.

publicradiointernational:

Would you make your password public for art? About 600 people did.
The creators of Trust Me, It’s Art asked users to share their passwords to make a statement about internet security. And people are submitting their passwords.
It’s “the rush that you get when you enter your password. You find it in the gallery. It’s always staring at you. You feel vulnerable,” said Jure Martinec, who created the Trust Me It’s Art site with fellow graphic design students Klemen Ilovar and Nejc Prah in Slovenia’s capital, Ljubljana.
Dan Goodin, the security editor of the US tech website Ars Technica, says the approach of Trust Me It’s Art’s creators is wrong-headed as any password that’s submitted to the site can be easily exploited by hackers.
While all submissions are anonymous, and they’re continuously shuffled, there aren’t any special security precautions. The creators of the site say they wouldn’t mind if a hacker did exploit the passwords.
More.
(Image: Submitted passwords at trustmeitsart.com.)

publicradiointernational:

Would you make your password public for art? About 600 people did.

The creators of Trust Me, It’s Art asked users to share their passwords to make a statement about internet security. And people are submitting their passwords.

It’s “the rush that you get when you enter your password. You find it in the gallery. It’s always staring at you. You feel vulnerable,” said Jure Martinec, who created the Trust Me It’s Art site with fellow graphic design students Klemen Ilovar and Nejc Prah in Slovenia’s capital, Ljubljana.

Dan Goodin, the security editor of the US tech website Ars Technica, says the approach of Trust Me It’s Art’s creators is wrong-headed as any password that’s submitted to the site can be easily exploited by hackers.

While all submissions are anonymous, and they’re continuously shuffled, there aren’t any special security precautions. The creators of the site say they wouldn’t mind if a hacker did exploit the passwords.

More.

(Image: Submitted passwords at trustmeitsart.com.)

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Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired

And it’s Kahle’s impulse to copy and preserve that prompted the Internet Society to induct the serial entrepreneur and digital archivist into the Internet Hall of Fame on April 23 in its inaugural year.

Kahle took the library of libraries — the internet — and made a couple of copies of it, and keeps making copies. One he keeps in servers in San Francisco, the other in mirror servers in Alexandria, where the world’s most famous library burned 2,000 years ago. (His data survived the Egyptian revolution unscathed.)

Through the Wayback Machine, you can see what the web looked like in 1996. And 1997. And 2011.

It’s just one arm of Kahle’s ambitious goal to provide the world with universal access to all knowledge.

His vehicle is the Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization Kahle founded in 1996, the same year he started analytics firm Alexa Internet, a pioneer in collaborative filtering, which he sold in 1999 to Amazon for $250 million.

“I won the internet lottery,” Kahle says.

Or, more aptly, the internet won the internet lottery. Since selling Alexa, Kahle has grown the Internet Archive, which he refers to as Alexandria 2.0, into a massive digital repository that has not only made copies of the internet, but has made available 200,000 e-books (and digitizes 1,000 more each day), 100,000 concert recordings, and some 700,000 films.

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Brazilian indians go online to demand their rights are protected
Despite their poor economic and living conditions, Brazil’s indigenous peoples are increasingly using the internet to make their struggle for rights known to the world.
Historically, native Brazilians have been deprived of proper citizenship, first by slavery and the loss of their homeland in the 16th century and, after that, by prejudice, impoverishment, the loss of cultural traces and the disappearance of entire populations. But, the emergence of the internet has allowed Brazilian Indians access to a new era of free speech and civil activity.

Brazilian indians go online to demand their rights are protected

Despite their poor economic and living conditions, Brazil’s indigenous peoples are increasingly using the internet to make their struggle for rights known to the world.

Historically, native Brazilians have been deprived of proper citizenship, first by slavery and the loss of their homeland in the 16th century and, after that, by prejudice, impoverishment, the loss of cultural traces and the disappearance of entire populations. But, the emergence of the internet has allowed Brazilian Indians access to a new era of free speech and civil activity.

It helps to envision modern journalism as a kind of video game. If you’re part of the Internet media, everything you put out into the world comes with its own scoring system. Tweets are counted by retweets and favorites, stories are scored by page views and Facebook likes. A writer’s reach and influence is visible right there, in the number of his followers and the number of “influencers” who subscribe to his or her feed. If you’re wondering why so many writers and journalists from such divergent backgrounds would feel the need to instantly tweet out unconfirmed information to their followers, all you have to do is think of the modern Internet reporter as some form of super Redditor — to be silent is to lose points. To be retweeted is to gain them. We do it for the “karma.”