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It was thanks to William Kentridge that we discovered Franco [PDF at Songlines], the legendary Congolese musician. For that alone we are reposting anything to do with the man.
livefromthenypl:

WILLIAM KENTRIDGE: I’ll tell you a story. A German scientist, Felix Eberty, had come to understand that the speed of light had a fixed speed and wasn’t instantaneous, and he worked out that everything that had been seen on earth was moving out from earth at the speed of light, so instead of having space as a vacuum, he described it as suffused with images of everything that had happened on earth. You would just have to be at the right distance from earth to be at the right moment to see what had happened in the archive—to see anything that had happened—so if you had to start 2000 light years away, in his terms you could see the crucifixion. If you were 500 light years away, you could see Dürer making his Melancholia print, which is 500 years old now.
I was intrigued with the idea of space full of this archive of images that was spreading out. I thought of that in terms of a ceiling projection with all these images…[But] it was jettisoned because it was very complicated in terms of the physical projection. How would you see it? Would everybody have mirrors to look at the ceiling to look from down below (which I had done before)? At one stage we had a whole Room of Failures, which was all the things that didn’t work, which we still could have done.—from “Death, Time, Soup: A Conversation with William Kentridge and Peter Galison” by Margaret K. Koerner 
Kentridge came to LIVE in March of 2010 on the occasion of his Metropolitan Opera directing debut for Shostakovich’s The Nose. Watch this Conversation Portrait from the evening by our Artist-in-Residence, Flash Rosenberg, aptly titled, “Learning from the Absurd”.

It was thanks to William Kentridge that we discovered Franco [PDF at Songlines], the legendary Congolese musician. For that alone we are reposting anything to do with the man.

livefromthenypl:

WILLIAM KENTRIDGE: I’ll tell you a story. A German scientist, Felix Eberty, had come to understand that the speed of light had a fixed speed and wasn’t instantaneous, and he worked out that everything that had been seen on earth was moving out from earth at the speed of light, so instead of having space as a vacuum, he described it as suffused with images of everything that had happened on earth. You would just have to be at the right distance from earth to be at the right moment to see what had happened in the archive—to see anything that had happened—so if you had to start 2000 light years away, in his terms you could see the crucifixion. If you were 500 light years away, you could see Dürer making his Melancholia print, which is 500 years old now.

I was intrigued with the idea of space full of this archive of images that was spreading out. I thought of that in terms of a ceiling projection with all these images…[But] it was jettisoned because it was very complicated in terms of the physical projection. How would you see it? Would everybody have mirrors to look at the ceiling to look from down below (which I had done before)? At one stage we had a whole Room of Failures, which was all the things that didn’t work, which we still could have done.
—from “Death, Time, Soup: A Conversation with William Kentridge and Peter Galison” by Margaret K. Koerner 

Kentridge came to LIVE in March of 2010 on the occasion of his Metropolitan Opera directing debut for Shostakovich’s The Nose. Watch this Conversation Portrait from the evening by our Artist-in-Residence, Flash Rosenberg, aptly titled, “Learning from the Absurd”.

frenchhistory:


Musette, end of 17th centuryFrenchIvory, silver, leather, silk, wood, and paper
L. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm) chanter with tenonPurchase, Clara Mertens Bequest, in memory of André Mertens, 2002 (2003.63a–d)
@credits

The musette is a refined form of bagpipe with a bellows that generates wind to inflate the bag and sound a chanter and a bourdon. The bourdon is a device to play the drones. This musette is one of the luxurious pieces used in French aristocratic circles between 1620 and 1760. The instrument features a double chanter, a novelty that emerged soon after 1670, and a bourdon for three double reeds and four sliders. The sliders allow the play of one, two, or three drones. The double chanter operates with only one double reed.
The instrument is unsigned, but its decoration of ebony studs in the ivory is also seen in instruments by Dupuis, who worked in Paris around 1690. The instrument is original in all its parts. The silk bag is almost entirely bleached out, but still has some pink and yellow. Musettes from around 1700 and in original condition are rarely found on the market.

frenchhistory:

Musette, end of 17th century
French
Ivory, silver, leather, silk, wood, and paper

L. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm) chanter with tenon
Purchase, Clara Mertens Bequest, in memory of André Mertens, 2002 (2003.63a–d)

@credits

The musette is a refined form of bagpipe with a bellows that generates wind to inflate the bag and sound a chanter and a bourdon. The bourdon is a device to play the drones. This musette is one of the luxurious pieces used in French aristocratic circles between 1620 and 1760. The instrument features a double chanter, a novelty that emerged soon after 1670, and a bourdon for three double reeds and four sliders. The sliders allow the play of one, two, or three drones. The double chanter operates with only one double reed.

The instrument is unsigned, but its decoration of ebony studs in the ivory is also seen in instruments by Dupuis, who worked in Paris around 1690. The instrument is original in all its parts. The silk bag is almost entirely bleached out, but still has some pink and yellow. Musettes from around 1700 and in original condition are rarely found on the market.

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photo by ArnoldWellsPhotography on CC license

Having hacked his way through adversaries playing screen roles like Captain Jack Sparrow and Sweeney Todd, Johnny Depp will now be slicing into manuscripts (ideally with a red pen, and not with a cutlass or a razor blade) as he starts his own literary imprint.

The Harper imprint of HarperCollins Publishers said on Tuesday that it was creating a new list of books, called Infinitum Nihil, that will publish titles reflecting Mr. Depp’s eclectic tastes and interests…

Mr. Depp, who has been known to pick up a guitar from time to time, said in a statement: “I pledge, on behalf of Infinitum Nihil, that we will do our best to deliver publications worthy of peoples’ time, of peoples’ concern. Publications that might ordinarily never have breached the parapet. For this dream realized, we would like to salute HarperCollins for their faith in us and look forward to a long and fruitful relationship together.”

(Source: The New York Times)

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The rock band Dinosaur Feathers wrote the catchiest Game of Thrones tribute that you will ever hear. After touring the country listening to George R.R. Martin’s fantasy series, the band wrote a tribute called “Please, please, George” (second track below) that pleads for the author to finish his latest book.

"Winter is coming/and you’re running out of time."

(Source: dinosaurfeathersmusic.blogspot.com)

jazzinbooks:

30 Bands. 30 Locations. 1 Setlist.
You’ve never experienced autumn in Central Park like this before. Brilliant with the colors of fall and more alive with great jazz than ever before, for one afternoon Central Park will be teeming with talent, as artists perform in every corner of this great urban oasis.
From the shadow of Duke Ellington’s statue to the hum of Columbus Circle – and virtually everywhere in between – the Park will be filled with music. Enter anywhere you like, linger as long as you like. Stop in at an information center if you need directions or mementos. Let the music and this map be your guide.
Thirty ensembles will be interpreting a single list of songs as they perform at some of Central Park’s most beloved sites throughout the afternoon. Each will use the setlist to paint the aural landscape in their own style. Find new favorite artists, songs, and places as you explore Central Park in a whole new way — and enjoy.
Jazz & Colors is a free public concert.

jazzinbooks:

30 Bands. 30 Locations. 1 Setlist.

You’ve never experienced autumn in Central Park like this before. Brilliant with the colors of fall and more alive with great jazz than ever before, for one afternoon Central Park will be teeming with talent, as artists perform in every corner of this great urban oasis.

From the shadow of Duke Ellington’s statue to the hum of Columbus Circle – and virtually everywhere in between – the Park will be filled with music. Enter anywhere you like, linger as long as you like. Stop in at an information center if you need directions or mementos. Let the music and this map be your guide.

Thirty ensembles will be interpreting a single list of songs as they perform at some of Central Park’s most beloved sites throughout the afternoon. Each will use the setlist to paint the aural landscape in their own style. Find new favorite artists, songs, and places as you explore Central Park in a whole new way — and enjoy.

Jazz & Colors is a free public concert.