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No one can deceive you unless he makes you think he is telling the truth. The unblushingly romantic has far less power to deceive than the apparently realistic. Admitted fantasy is precisely the kind of Literature which never deceives at all. Children are not deceived by fairy-tales; they are often and gravely deceived by school-stories*. Adults are not deceived by science-fiction; they can be deceived by the stories in the women’s magazines. None of us are deceived by the Odyssey, the Kalevala, Beowulf, or Malory. The real danger lurks in sober-faced novels where all appears to be very probably but all is in fact contrived to put across some social or ethical or religious or anti-religious ‘comment on life’ … To be sure, no novel will deceive the best type of reader. He never mistakes art either for life or for philosophy. He can enter, while he reads, into each author’s point of view without either accepting or rejecting it, suspending when necessary his disbelief and (what is harder) his belief.
C.S. Lewis on Fact vs. Fiction (via poydrasreview)
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The following post was written by PEN World Voices correspondent Sean Kevin Campbell.

“We’re in a bar; it’s late at night; let’s talk about Hegel! Let’s talk about Hegel’s Phenomenology! I’ve brought my copy along.” That was Simon Critchley Tuesday night, on stage at The Standard, eagerly flipping through the pages of his gradually disintegrating book: “This is what an obsessional book look like. It falls apart, and I reshuffle pages, apparently.”

We drank tequila compliments of Ilegal Mezcal, we explored the limits of memory, both human and artificial, and yes, we listened to the ideas of 18th century German philosophers in the first of World Voices’ Obsession series. Seriously, if you can think of a better way to spend a Tuesday, I don’t want to be your friend.

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In honor of Jane Austen’s birthday today, some of her thoughts on life, happiness, and reading:
“I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.”  Emma“I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”  Pride & Prejudice"The company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."  Persuasion“Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!”  Love & Friendship“But for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.”  Catharine

In honor of Jane Austen’s birthday today, some of her thoughts on life, happiness, and reading:

“I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.”  Emma

“I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”  Pride & Prejudice

"The company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."  Persuasion

“Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!”  Love & Friendship

“But for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.”  Catharine