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fictionthatmatters:

Rachel Riederer on the Human Rights Watch Film Festival

Knowing that these are true stories takes the pleasure out of the horror-movie fear, but human rights documentaries offer a different set of rewards. It’s thrilling to see a plucky hero escape a fantastical monster, but it’s even more frightening to see the monsters that really do walk among us, and even more stirring when the plucky hero is real. I can think of no horror-movie premise to rival the one described by a female soldier in The Invisible War: repeatedly drugged and raped on a remote island base, she was not able to tell anyone—the only outside phone line was monitored by her attackers. Her account of escaping with her life and sanity intact is as gripping as anything Stephen King has dreamed up.

Image from Flickr via NimahelPhotoArt 
(via Rachel Riederer: Human Rights Horror Stories - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics by Rachel Riederer - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics)

fictionthatmatters:

Rachel Riederer on the Human Rights Watch Film Festival

Knowing that these are true stories takes the pleasure out of the horror-movie fear, but human rights documentaries offer a different set of rewards. It’s thrilling to see a plucky hero escape a fantastical monster, but it’s even more frightening to see the monsters that really do walk among us, and even more stirring when the plucky hero is real. I can think of no horror-movie premise to rival the one described by a female soldier in The Invisible War: repeatedly drugged and raped on a remote island base, she was not able to tell anyone—the only outside phone line was monitored by her attackers. Her account of escaping with her life and sanity intact is as gripping as anything Stephen King has dreamed up.

Image from Flickr via NimahelPhotoArt

(via Rachel Riederer: Human Rights Horror Stories - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics by Rachel Riederer - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics)