PEN on Twitter

millionsmillions:

“The year is 1962, and ad exec Martin K. Speckter has a punctuation problem.
Madison Avenue is debating the merits of a streamlined new European import called Helvetica. Roy Lichtenstein’s filling canvases with comic book characters and hand-painted typefaces. Andy Warhol’s cranking out Campbell’s soup cans in The Factory. Art is becoming commerce and commerce, art.
Meanwhile, JFK’s in office, the Vietnam War’s escalating, and The Pill’s finally received FDA approval. What’s needed is a typographically elegant way to notate surprise, disbelief, and incredulous excitement. For a single symbol to punctuate sentences like “Who’s that?!” and “What the hell?!”
Speckter’s solution? The interrobang. A stylish fusion of the question mark (that’s the “interro” part) and the exclamation point (known in old-timey typesetter’s slang as the “bang”), his unusual new creation looked like this.”
— You Call that a Punctuation Mark?! The Interrobang Celebrates its 50th Birthday by Nora Maynard

millionsmillions:

“The year is 1962, and ad exec Martin K. Speckter has a punctuation problem.

Madison Avenue is debating the merits of a streamlined new European import called Helvetica. Roy Lichtenstein’s filling canvases with comic book characters and hand-painted typefaces. Andy Warhol’s cranking out Campbell’s soup cans in The Factory. Art is becoming commerce and commerce, art.

Meanwhile, JFK’s in office, the Vietnam War’s escalating, and The Pill’s finally received FDA approval. What’s needed is a typographically elegant way to notate surprise, disbelief, and incredulous excitement. For a single symbol to punctuate sentences like “Who’s that?!” and “What the hell?!”

Speckter’s solution? The interrobang. A stylish fusion of the question mark (that’s the “interro” part) and the exclamation point (known in old-timey typesetter’s slang as the “bang”), his unusual new creation looked like this.”

You Call that a Punctuation Mark?! The Interrobang Celebrates its 50th Birthday by Nora Maynard

arreter:

Ink Calender by Oscar Diaz: The ’Ink Calendar’ uses the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are ‘printed’ daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. A calendar self-updated, which enhances the perception of time passing and not only signalling it. The ink colors are based on a spectrum, which relate to a ‘color temperature scale’, each month having a color related to our perception of the weather on that month. The colors range from dark blue in December to, three shades of green in spring or oranges, red in the summer.
arreter:

Ink Calender by Oscar Diaz: The ’Ink Calendar’ uses the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are ‘printed’ daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. A calendar self-updated, which enhances the perception of time passing and not only signalling it. The ink colors are based on a spectrum, which relate to a ‘color temperature scale’, each month having a color related to our perception of the weather on that month. The colors range from dark blue in December to, three shades of green in spring or oranges, red in the summer.
arreter:

Ink Calender by Oscar Diaz: The ’Ink Calendar’ uses the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are ‘printed’ daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. A calendar self-updated, which enhances the perception of time passing and not only signalling it. The ink colors are based on a spectrum, which relate to a ‘color temperature scale’, each month having a color related to our perception of the weather on that month. The colors range from dark blue in December to, three shades of green in spring or oranges, red in the summer.

arreter:

Ink Calender by Oscar Diaz: The ’Ink Calendar’ uses the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are ‘printed’ daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. A calendar self-updated, which enhances the perception of time passing and not only signalling it. The ink colors are based on a spectrum, which relate to a ‘color temperature scale’, each month having a color related to our perception of the weather on that month. The colors range from dark blue in December to, three shades of green in spring or oranges, red in the summer.

A book written in disappearing ink

In Buenos Aires, small bookshop and publisher Eterna Cadencia has been wrestling with the question of the role of books in a digital age. These days, e-books seem more important, more interesting, than their print counterparts. How can print books take on a measure of urgency?

Eterna Cadencia’s answer seems, at first, counterintuitive: It printed a book with disappearing ink.

The book, “El Libro que No Puede Esperar” (The Book That Can’t Wait), comes sealed in a plastic wrapper. Once the wrapper is removed and the book is cracked, the ink begins to age; it’s got a lifespan of less than two months. Just months after being opened, The Book That Can’t Wait is filled with nothing but blank pages.

Thanks to @harikunzru for the tip on this amazing piece!

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

Writers take note!
futurejournalismproject:

Would you Abandon the QWERTY Keyboard
And Australian entrepreneur has spent 25 years trying to get an alternative to the QWERTY keyboard into the market. With the rise of smartphone touch screens, he thinks he might have a chance.
Via Stuff:

[John] Lambie is in the United States shopping around his keyboard, which has been designed for optimum use with just one finger or to split itself in two to make typing easier with two thumbs.
The Dextr keyboard is in alphabetical order with the letters split over five rows instead of three and it is able to be flipped for easier use by left handed people.
“I’ve been playing with ideas, doodling things in the margin as it were for over 25 years,” Mr Lambie said.
“I was inspired by a lecturer at university who had severe cerebral palsy and therefore very limited use of his hands and fingers and he would always, in every single lecture, find some way to say some derogatory remark about QWERTY.
“He said it really is the worst piece of usability design ever.
“It’s become so entrenched unfortunately that the human race is almost stuck with it.”
Mr Lambie pointed out the QWERTY keyboard was originally designed to slow people down and space the most used letters far apart so typewriter arms would not stick together.

Lambie’s target audience is in the developing world where people have not grown up with — or accustomed to — the QWERTY keyboard but are now buying low-cost smart and feature phones.

Writers take note!

futurejournalismproject:

Would you Abandon the QWERTY Keyboard

And Australian entrepreneur has spent 25 years trying to get an alternative to the QWERTY keyboard into the market. With the rise of smartphone touch screens, he thinks he might have a chance.

Via Stuff:

[John] Lambie is in the United States shopping around his keyboard, which has been designed for optimum use with just one finger or to split itself in two to make typing easier with two thumbs.

The Dextr keyboard is in alphabetical order with the letters split over five rows instead of three and it is able to be flipped for easier use by left handed people.

“I’ve been playing with ideas, doodling things in the margin as it were for over 25 years,” Mr Lambie said.

“I was inspired by a lecturer at university who had severe cerebral palsy and therefore very limited use of his hands and fingers and he would always, in every single lecture, find some way to say some derogatory remark about QWERTY.

“He said it really is the worst piece of usability design ever.

“It’s become so entrenched unfortunately that the human race is almost stuck with it.”

Mr Lambie pointed out the QWERTY keyboard was originally designed to slow people down and space the most used letters far apart so typewriter arms would not stick together.

Lambie’s target audience is in the developing world where people have not grown up with — or accustomed to — the QWERTY keyboard but are now buying low-cost smart and feature phones.

typeworship:

Type Worship is joining forces with 8 Faces Magazine.
Today, I am incredibly excited to announce that Type Worship is to become the official 8 Faces blog.
This means that in addition to the inspirational typography and beautiful letterforms we’ll also be sharing exclusive content from Elliot Jay Stocks’ coveted typography biannual, featuring mini-interviews with big-name designers, previews of their artwork and sneak-peaks of forthcoming magazine content.
In the last year Type Worship has attracted a staggering 35,000 followers on Tumblr and we’ll continue to publish via their fantastic platform at blog.8faces.com.

Elliot Jay Stocks: “As we were chatting about Type Worship joining the family, everything just kind of fell into place. I’m really, really excited about this partnership.”

This announcement coincides with my 400th post for the blog and with so much still to learn and discover—we’re only just getting started! I’d like to thank all typography and lettering enthusiasts for your continued support.
typeworship:

Type Worship is joining forces with 8 Faces Magazine.
Today, I am incredibly excited to announce that Type Worship is to become the official 8 Faces blog.
This means that in addition to the inspirational typography and beautiful letterforms we’ll also be sharing exclusive content from Elliot Jay Stocks’ coveted typography biannual, featuring mini-interviews with big-name designers, previews of their artwork and sneak-peaks of forthcoming magazine content.
In the last year Type Worship has attracted a staggering 35,000 followers on Tumblr and we’ll continue to publish via their fantastic platform at blog.8faces.com.

Elliot Jay Stocks: “As we were chatting about Type Worship joining the family, everything just kind of fell into place. I’m really, really excited about this partnership.”

This announcement coincides with my 400th post for the blog and with so much still to learn and discover—we’re only just getting started! I’d like to thank all typography and lettering enthusiasts for your continued support.

typeworship:

Type Worship is joining forces with 8 Faces Magazine.

Today, I am incredibly excited to announce that Type Worship is to become the official 8 Faces blog.

This means that in addition to the inspirational typography and beautiful letterforms we’ll also be sharing exclusive content from Elliot Jay Stocks’ coveted typography biannual, featuring mini-interviews with big-name designers, previews of their artwork and sneak-peaks of forthcoming magazine content.

In the last year Type Worship has attracted a staggering 35,000 followers on Tumblr and we’ll continue to publish via their fantastic platform at blog.8faces.com.

Elliot Jay Stocks: “As we were chatting about Type Worship joining the family, everything just kind of fell into place. I’m really, really excited about this partnership.”

This announcement coincides with my 400th post for the blog and with so much still to learn and discover—we’re only just getting started!
I’d like to thank all typography and lettering enthusiasts for your continued support.